BOARD OF DIRECTORS RESOLUTION – RDC No. 429, OF OCTOBER 8, 2020 / NORMATIVE INSTRUCTION – IN No. 75

Authors: ANVISA

October 2020 – Regulation from the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA), of the Ministry of Public Health of Brazil regarding the nutritional labeling of food (including beverages) and technical requirements. It excludes unprocessed and minimally processed foods, aligning with the Dietary Guidelines for the Brazilian Population. It requires Front-of-Package Nutritional Labeling (FoPNL), featuring rectangles with magnifying glasses and legends “High in: Saturated fats / added sugars / sodium” (white letters on a black background), when these quantities exceed the limits established by ANVISA. It enhances the design, content, and legibility of the nutritional information panel, in black lettering on a white background. It includes mandatory information on: total and added sugars, number of servings per package, and all information on nutrient content per 100 g or 100 ml. It was approved in 2020 and began to be enforced in 2022.

Regulación de la Agencia nacional de vigilancia sanitaria (ANVISA), del Ministerio de Salud Pública de Brasil sobre el etiquetado nutricional de alimentos (bebidas incluidas) y requisitos técnicos. Excluye los alimentos sin procesar y mínimamente procesados, lo que se alinea con las Guías Alimentarias para la Población Brasileña. Requiere etiquetado frontal nutricional (FoPNL), de rectángulos con lupa y leyendas “Alto en: Grasas saturadas / azúcares agregados / sodio (letras blancas sobre fondo negro), cuando esta cantidades superen los limites establecidos ANVISA. Mejora el diseño, contenido y legibilidad del panel de información nutricional, en letra negra sobre fondo blanco. Incluye la información obligatoria de: azúcares totales y añadidos, número de porciones del producto por envase, y toda la información sobre el contenido de nutrientes por 100 g o 100 ml. Fue aprobada en el 2020 y comenzó a aplicarse en el 2022.

https://antigo.anvisa.gov.br/documents/10181/3882585/RDC_429_2020_.pdf/9dc15f3a-db4c-4d3f-90d8-ef4b80537380

Structural responses to the obesity and non‐communicable diseases epidemic: Update on the Chilean law of food labelling and advertising

Authors: C. Corvalán; M. Reyes; M. L. Garmendia; R. Uauy

2018 – Chile approved the law of food labelling and advertising in 2012; this law aims to address the obesity epidemic, particularly in children. The implementation details were published in 2015, and the law was implemented finally in 2016. Regulated foods were defined based on a specially developed nutrient profiling, which considered natural foods as gold standard. For liquid foods, amounts of energy, sugars, saturated fats, and sodium in 100 mL of cow’s milk were used as cut‐offs. For solid foods, values within the 90th ‐ 99th percentile range for energy and critical nutrients were selected as cut‐off within a list of natural foods. A stop sign stating “High in ” was chosen as warning label for packaged regulated foods. Regulated foods were also forbidden to be sold or offered for free at kiosks, cafeterias, and feeding programme at schools and nurseries. Besides, regulated foods cannot be promoted to children under 14 years. A staggered implementation of the regulation was decided, with nutrients cut‐offs becoming increasingly stricter over a 3‐year period. These regulatory efforts are in the right direction but will have to be sustained and complemented with other actions to achieve their ultimate impact of halting the obesity epidemic.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/obr.12802

Structural responses to the obesity and non‐communicable diseases epidemic: Update on the Chilean law of food labelling and advertising

Authors: C. Corvalán; M. Reyes; M. L. Garmendia; R. Uauy

October 2018 – Chile approved the law of food labelling and advertising in 2012; this law aims to address the obesity epidemic, particularly in children. The implementation details were published in 2015, and the law was implemented finally in 2016. Regulated foods were defined based on a specially developed nutrient profiling, which considered natural foods as gold standard. For liquid foods, amounts of energy, sugars, saturated fats, and sodium in 100 mL of cow’s milk were used as cut‐offs. For solid foods, values within the 90th ‐ 99th percentile range for energy and critical nutrients were selected as cut‐off within a list of natural foods. A stop sign stating “High in ” was chosen as warning label for packaged regulated foods. Regulated foods were also forbidden to be sold or offered for free at kiosks, cafeterias, and feeding programme at schools and nurseries. Besides, regulated foods cannot be promoted to children under 14 years. A staggered implementation of the regulation was decided, with nutrients cut‐offs becoming increasingly stricter over a 3‐year period. These regulatory efforts are in the right direction but will have to be sustained and complemented with other actions to achieve their ultimate impact of halting the obesity epidemic.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/obr.12802