UNICEF calls on governments, the business sector and civil society to work together to improve advertising practices aimed at children and adolescents.

Author: UNICEF

June 30, 2015 – UNICEF calls on governments, companies and civil society to work together to improve advertising practices aimed at children and adolescents, within the framework of the presentation of the exploratory study Promotion and advertising of unhealthy food and beverages aimed at children in Latin America and the Caribbean, promoted by UNICEF in collaboration with the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama (INCAP), which is made public today in the city of San José, Costa Rica.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/mva17yzz7se27qa/AAB1Ac3i7QwrZGri9mqwe3FFa/Acciones%20de%20incidencia%20pol%C3%ADtica/2015.06.30%20Publicidad%20en%20ni%C3%B1os%20UNICEF?dl=0&preview=NP+estudio+MKT+obesidad+c.doc&subfolder_nav_tracking=1

Exploratory study on the promotion and advertising of unhealthy food and beverages aimed at children in Latin America and the Caribbean. Executive summary of results.

Author: UNICEF

2013 – The influence of unhealthy food and beverage promotion and advertising practices (high in fat, sugar and salt) aimed at children is one of the main causes of childhood obesity and the development of chronic non-communicable diseases in adulthood. . Exploratory study that aims to identify the regulations in force in the region regarding the regulation of the promotion and advertising of food and beverages aimed at children; and more specifically in Mexico, Argentina and Costa Rica.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/mva17yzz7se27qa/AAB1Ac3i7QwrZGri9mqwe3FFa/Acciones%20de%20incidencia%20pol%C3%ADtica/2015.06.30%20Publicidad%20en%20ni%C3%B1os%20UNICEF?dl=0&preview=Estudio+Exporatorio+promocion+alimentos+no+saludables+dirigida+a+ni%C3%B1os+en+LAC.pdf&subfolder_nav_tracking=1

Structural responses to the obesity and non‐communicable diseases epidemic: Update on the Chilean law of food labelling and advertising

Authors: C. Corvalán; M. Reyes; M. L. Garmendia; R. Uauy

2018 – Chile approved the law of food labelling and advertising in 2012; this law aims to address the obesity epidemic, particularly in children. The implementation details were published in 2015, and the law was implemented finally in 2016. Regulated foods were defined based on a specially developed nutrient profiling, which considered natural foods as gold standard. For liquid foods, amounts of energy, sugars, saturated fats, and sodium in 100 mL of cow’s milk were used as cut‐offs. For solid foods, values within the 90th ‐ 99th percentile range for energy and critical nutrients were selected as cut‐off within a list of natural foods. A stop sign stating “High in ” was chosen as warning label for packaged regulated foods. Regulated foods were also forbidden to be sold or offered for free at kiosks, cafeterias, and feeding programme at schools and nurseries. Besides, regulated foods cannot be promoted to children under 14 years. A staggered implementation of the regulation was decided, with nutrients cut‐offs becoming increasingly stricter over a 3‐year period. These regulatory efforts are in the right direction but will have to be sustained and complemented with other actions to achieve their ultimate impact of halting the obesity epidemic.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/obr.12802

Structural responses to the obesity and non-communicable diseases epidemic: the Chilean Law of Food Labeling and Advertising

Authors: C. Corvalán; M. Reyes; M. L. Garmendia; R. Uauy

2013 – Chilean Senate approved the Law of Food Labeling and Advertising, resulting from the joint efforts of a group of health professionals, researchers and legislators who proposed a regulatory framework in support of healthy diets and active living. Its goal was to curb the ongoing epidemic increase of obesity and non-communicable diseases. Two actions included: (i) improving point of food purchase consumer information by incorporating easy-to-understand front-of-packages labeling and specific messages addressing critical nutrients, and (ii) decreasing children’s exposure to unhealthy foods by restricting marketing, advertising and sales.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/obr.12099

Structural responses to the obesity and non‐communicable diseases epidemic: Update on the Chilean law of food labelling and advertising

Authors: C. Corvalán; M. Reyes; M. L. Garmendia; R. Uauy

October 2018 – Chile approved the law of food labelling and advertising in 2012; this law aims to address the obesity epidemic, particularly in children. The implementation details were published in 2015, and the law was implemented finally in 2016. Regulated foods were defined based on a specially developed nutrient profiling, which considered natural foods as gold standard. For liquid foods, amounts of energy, sugars, saturated fats, and sodium in 100 mL of cow’s milk were used as cut‐offs. For solid foods, values within the 90th ‐ 99th percentile range for energy and critical nutrients were selected as cut‐off within a list of natural foods. A stop sign stating “High in ” was chosen as warning label for packaged regulated foods. Regulated foods were also forbidden to be sold or offered for free at kiosks, cafeterias, and feeding programme at schools and nurseries. Besides, regulated foods cannot be promoted to children under 14 years. A staggered implementation of the regulation was decided, with nutrients cut‐offs becoming increasingly stricter over a 3‐year period. These regulatory efforts are in the right direction but will have to be sustained and complemented with other actions to achieve their ultimate impact of halting the obesity epidemic.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/obr.12802

Chile: Healthy country

Author: Guido Girardi

August 2017 – Presentation on health risk factors: the movement, development of law 20.606 on nutritional composition, advertising, and evaluation studies on the law.

https://interamericanheart.org/Repository/1.21chilepaissaludablegirardi.pdf